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Old 10 October 2018, 08:05   #21
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Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Denny
Boat name: Hebridean Storm
Make: Coastline
Length: 6m +
Engine: Mariner F150
MMSI: 235107505
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,285
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pikey Dave View Post
I can see how it helps on a bunk trailer, but a properly set up roller type trailer should do that anyway. I put the nose into the rollers which grab the bow & line it up with the trailer. Put the engine straight ahead & leave it ticking over in gear, the boat is now fixed at both ends. If solo I can jump out, attach the winch & pull the boat up, when the winch has got the boat, I kill the engine & complete the recovery.
+1

By the time the boat reaches the bow roller the rest of the trailer rollers have squared it up.

Not a fan of keel rollers...more of a problem than a solution.

My recovery is at the end of Dubrus' second video on post #7. I leave the boat on a "hard idle" in gear to keep it on the trailer reach over the bow, secure the quick release chain fitting and put a couple of turns of the bow line round the top of the trailer ladder, kill and trim engine and the wife hauls us out. Really have never had to use the winch except for securing at "road prep".

Spend the time setting up the trailer, it pays off in the end.
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Old 10 October 2018, 18:10   #22
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Country: Australia
Town: Dalmeny
Make: zodiac
Length: 5m +
Engine: outboard
Join Date: May 2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Last Tango View Post
+1

By the time the boat reaches the bow roller the rest of the trailer rollers have squared it up.

Not a fan of keel rollers...more of a problem than a solution.

My recovery is at the end of Dubrus' second video on post #7. I leave the boat on a "hard idle" in gear to keep it on the trailer reach over the bow, secure the quick release chain fitting and put a couple of turns of the bow line round the top of the trailer ladder, kill and trim engine and the wife hauls us out. Really have never had to use the winch except for securing at "road prep".

Spend the time setting up the trailer, it pays off in the end.


Keel rollers support the strongest thickest part of the hull, maybe it's because so many people here do such long distances ( often off-road ) that we tend to mostly use keel supports. I bought one boat which was on a trailer without keel supports, which at two years old was covered in stress fractures. The hull was a comercial build with a 10 year structural warranty, unfortunately because the hull wasn't supported by a keel rollered trailer the company had a loop hole to get out of the repairs. The warranty covered defects from ocean use not wrong trailer choice.

Another boat I purchased had carpeted skids, first launch I eneded having to back the car so far in the water my car exhaust was bubbling under water ( like in the video you posted with the stuck red rib). The boat had been used in its very short life on Fraser Island ( QLD ), the beach use had allowed sand to get into the carpet ( just like salt build up does ). This build up wore through the gelcoat, thinning down the glass and once again causing structural issues with the hull.

Both the above boats were repaired and alterations were made to the trailers, neither are owned by me anymore. I tend to go through lots of boats and average around 500-600hrs per year on my own boats as well as 300-400hrs on other comercial dive boats. We have around 400 boats launch from our local ramp daily, I can honestly say I've only ever seen one other carpeted skid trailer and this one also had to get his boat deep into the water to launch, they might be ok from new but once the salt builds up and the marine carpet crushes they simply don't skid off.

Teflon v skids were trialled on some boats but are now only seen on aluminium boats. As mentioned here many of us tow boats great distances, much of which is dirt roads that for corrugations that destroy trailers and boats if they are built heavy duty. In this video you can see even the aluminium boats use both keel and skids.

The reason I mentioned someone testing these items your side of the pond is because of the negativity some people have over something they've not used or probably even seen. I've seen hundreds of people struggle to drive boats on trailers, it's something that attracts quite a gathering at our local ramp due to wind and tidal effects and something that isn't an issue for us.



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Old 11 October 2018, 12:52   #23
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Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Denny
Boat name: Hebridean Storm
Make: Coastline
Length: 6m +
Engine: Mariner F150
MMSI: 235107505
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,285
We probably don't do the road miles and there's not much left by way of unsurfaced roads (although some of them are in a pretty shocking state).
Maybe 3k a year myself and never had any "stress" damage on the hull as a result

My issue with keel rollers is the number of times I've see gouges near the keel line of boats that have been caused by them missing the rollers on the way onto the trailer or coming off while they were being hauled up.

One of the differences that's noticeable with American (don't know if Australia is the same) is the greater permitted width allows the boat to sit lower between the wheels rather than above the mud guards and that would make the rearmost keel roller less of a PIA.

Pulling figures out of the air I'd guess 90% of new RIB trailers sold here will be "Roller Coaster" type and the big seller is ease of launch and recovery.
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Old 11 October 2018, 18:26   #24
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Country: Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Last Tango View Post
We probably don't do the road miles and there's not much left by way of unsurfaced roads (although some of them are in a pretty shocking state).
Maybe 3k a year myself and never had any "stress" damage on the hull as a result

My issue with keel rollers is the number of times I've see gouges near the keel line of boats that have been caused by them missing the rollers on the way onto the trailer or coming off while they were being hauled up.

One of the differences that's noticeable with American (don't know if Australia is the same) is the greater permitted width allows the boat to sit lower between the wheels rather than above the mud guards and that would make the rearmost keel roller less of a PIA.

Pulling figures out of the air I'd guess 90% of new RIB trailers sold here will be "Roller Coaster" type and the big seller is ease of launch and recovery.

No our legal limits are more like the UK than the US, friends who have imported boat and trailers have had all kinds of issues and expense getting them modified to be legal here. The old black keel rollers were always known to only last a short time but haven't seen to many of the yellow or red ones with any problems even on the bigger 3.5 ton trailer boats. By the way people here seem to have very big trailer boats that in the U.K. would be kept on moorings. A dive buddy of mine tows a 9m Naiad with twin 300 Suzuki's behind his landcruiser, which is legal but certainly not something I would want to do. He also has a 7.8m Gemini with twin 150's for towing long distances, still not what I call fun on a 5 day drive.
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