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Old 18 July 2005, 13:47   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scary Des
I do not understand commercial fisherman................

........a way of making money and should not be viewed as a tradition
Des, well done, exactly my view.
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Old 18 July 2005, 16:54   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwalker
Yeh, you wait until they are covered with blood and blubber after the flenching knives have been used.
With full respect Jeff, the whales are set along side the ship and towed to the whaling station in Hvalfjörður (translated whalefjord) so no blood or blubber on board perhaps I will drive one evening or during the weekend and take some pics there to complete this thread which originally was meant to share with you RIB.net people our wonderful old harbour and red sunset.

It is only 45 minutes drive (one way) to the whaling station from Reykjavik.

For those of you interested in old military saga Hvalfjörður was base for the British and allies during the second world war and most of the convoys from US to Russia and UK did stop over on their way so this fjord should have more meaning to you guys than just whalings which was in operation during the war.

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Old 18 July 2005, 18:50   #33
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I'm just curious about the first photos... what time is sunset in Rejkavik at this time of the year ??

I'm also a bit curious (sceptical in a very uninformed way...) about re-introducing grey whales to the Irish Sea after they've been absent for 400 years - is there any notion of what led to their demise 400 years ago - doubtful it was over-fishing that killed them off then..
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Old 18 July 2005, 19:29   #34
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This picture was take around 2,45 in the morning (night).

Regarding the grey whales I have not a clue.

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Old 20 July 2005, 13:24   #35
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Originally Posted by prairie tuber
) Back to commercial fishing on the oceans, it comes down to greed, lack of accountability & national governing bodies not taking a strong stand. For example, Spain & Portugal have allowed their commercial fisherman to illegally fish off the Grand Banks of Newfoundland with illegal nets for years. Additionally the Canadian government (up until very recently) had been very weak kneed about protecting these regions, not only from foreign poaching but in not properly managing the seal populations as well. The result was a catastrophic loss of the cod fishery.
I can recommend a good book "Lament for an Ocean" by a chap called Michael Harris which chronicles the politics & mismanagement of the cod fishery that resulted in its collapse in the early 90's.
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Old 20 July 2005, 14:41   #36
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Commercial hunting of these magnificent creatures should not happen anymore, the only people who deserve to hunt them are those who eat the entire whale and people who have traditionally hunted them to survive in the past. To sell the meat to other countries is simply an irresponsible method for making money. Where I come from whales are hunted only for the meat which can be consumed locally and nothing more. The hunting methods are traditional such as harpoons for the most part sometimes 50 cal. rifles are used for the bowhead whale hunt which happens only once every two years and it's only one whale for the entire country (Canada), this ensures that traditional knowledge which has existed for over 3000 years is not lost, this is extremely important not only for the Inuit culture but also for survival because in some communities there are only 10 jobs and 0.5KG of beef costs $20CDN. This emphasis on the cultural link of the Inuit with whales is prevalent throughout the book: Inuit, whaling and sustainability. Because of the blanket bans on whaling imposed by the IWC, many Inuit communities were fearful of losing the skills needed to successfully hunt whales. The younger Inuit were faced with a future without ever eating whale meat or tasting maktak, which, up to that point, was a main part of their diet. Inuit, Whaling, and Sustainability points out that much of the social harmony of the Inuit is directly linked to whale hunting and the sharing of the whale itself within the community. The entire community is brought closer together with a unified sense of purpose through the cooperation necessary in a successful whale hunt.

"I would think our people would always hunt whales because it is something we do: it is part of our culture and I think culturally what you eat is very, very important. Inuit identity is important: Inuit don’t get a lot of identity out of eating beef"

In some respects, the marine diet has made the Inuit among the world's healthiest people. Beluga whale meat has 10 times the iron of beef, twice the protein and five times the Vitamin A.

Omega 3 fatty acids in the seafood protect the Inuit from heart disease and diabetes. Seventy-year-old Inuit men have coronary arteries as elastic as those of 20-year-old Danes, said Dr. Gert Mulvad of the Primary Health Care Clinic in Nuuk.

Pangnirtung, originally, was a whaling community. After a bowhead hunt, there was great excitement in the hamlet: for the first time in over fifty years the community had been given permission to harvest a Bowhead whale! Twenty four men, of all ages were selected to go on the hunt. The youngest male invited was a teenager, selected for his youth and ability to preserve the experience of the hunt for future generations.
It took three days to cut up the huge 42' x 24' whale. Everyone, young and old, feasted on whale blubber while celebratory speeches, singing and prayers went on all the while. Later in the community building, everyone danced the Scottish reel to accordion music, a legacy from their European visitors and partial ancestors for some.
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Old 20 July 2005, 21:18   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan
I can recommend a good book "Lament for an Ocean" by a chap called Michael Harris which chronicles the politics & mismanagement of the cod fishery that resulted in its collapse in the early 90's.
Alan I'll check it out - thanks.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Arctic RIB
In some respects, the marine diet has made the Inuit among the world's healthiest people. Beluga whale meat has 10 times the iron of beef, twice the protein and five times the Vitamin A.
This is interesting because it seems that a number of arctic mammals tolerated extremely high levels of vitamin A. I wonder if the livers of belugas have lethally toxic levels of vitamin A in the same way that polar bear livers and inuit sled dog livers do. There have been a number of early polar explorers who had done themselves in by consuming the livers of polar bears and sled dogs while trying to stave off starvation .


Quote:
Originally Posted by Arctic RIB
Omega 3 fatty acids in the seafood protect the Inuit from heart disease and diabetes. Seventy-year-old Inuit men have coronary arteries as elastic as those of 20-year-old Danes, said Dr. Gert Mulvad of the Primary Health Care Clinic in Nuuk.
Interesting. Alot of attention has recently been given to the Omega 3 F.As found in seals, in that they have a number of properties unique to more traditional sources of omega 3s (fish oil, flax, grape & hemp seed, etc...) . No shortage of seals in Canada!
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