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Old 27 May 2015, 12:00   #1
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Unseaworthy vessels - regulation needed?

I saw this today: Body found in search for missing Lewis boat - BBC News



It's a sad case. I've seen a couple of similar cases over the past year, when people put to sea in both makeshift boats or conventional craft that are in a very poor state of repair/preparation or are overloaded.

In the case here, the boat was photographed before departure. In another tragic case locally, a very overloaded boat was spotted about to sail and the crew were advised to remain in port - they didn't and there were fatalities a few minutes later.

My question for you is this - should there be authority vested in some agency to restrict the use of leisure craft that are unfit for purpose, or where the crew are intent on endangering themselves? I'm thinking of the extreme cases, obviously, but I know that once you start down that road it may become a slippery slope....
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Old 27 May 2015, 12:08   #2
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Think this will be an interesting thread, historical any suggestions of interference/legislations/rules gets beaten down. Who makes/enforces the rules, what are the penalties, do we stop at not seaworthy, what about LJ,Killcord,radio, skill/training?

Personally I think minimum std should be regulated for but many here disagree as I have found in the past.
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Old 27 May 2015, 12:26   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willk View Post

My question for you is this - should there be authority vested in some agency to restrict the use of leisure craft that are unfit for purpose, or where the crew are intent on endangering themselves? I'm thinking of the extreme cases, obviously, but I know that once you start down that road it may become a slippery slope....
With so many variables.....boat, equipment, weather, location, route plan, experience (or lack of). Where would you draw the lines. It would end up down to some individual's opinion and there would be some "jobs-worth" that thought it wasn't safe for a ten meter twin engined, fully equipped rib to go out for a run round the harbour when it was raining in case someone slipped on the wet deck and fell in. RYA's training is there for those who want it and there are plenty of self taught, experienced boaters who'll exercise common sense but I'd think the slippery slope might end up with compulsory PB2 or ICC then, like driving, people would pass their "basic driving test" and have no further training, believing that they're good drivers.
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Old 27 May 2015, 12:29   #4
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Think this will be an interesting thread, historical any suggestions of interference/legislations/rules gets beaten down.
I'll keep an eye on this one so it will remain civilised, but no-one wins a thread

For clarity, I'm thinking about vessels and crew who are clearly at very high risk so more the homer boats, very drunk crew, overloaded, sinking, whatever sort of stuff. I recall seeing a small punt launch with a father and two very young boys aboard. The main engine failed to start so they set off to fish on the aux. There was no buoyancy aboard - no jackets or buoys or cans. The kids had teeshirts and wellies on. I last saw them about three miles offshore. I was with a CG official who said that (had we been in the Republic of Ireland), he would have grounded them. So more that sort of scenario... The bloke in the OP obviously had issues, but he was photographed and allowed to go to sea, and his death.

Maybe we need a format for delivering "helpful caring intervention", rather than fines and lists of equipment and MOTs?

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Old 27 May 2015, 12:45   #5
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Or this guy: Britain's worst sailor dubbed Captain Calamity gets into difficulties for the FIFTEENTH time but declines help of lifeboatmen | Daily Mail Online


http://www.shannonside.ie/news/inque...-of-them-died/
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Old 27 May 2015, 13:30   #6
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Where do you stand on the similar subject of the jeans-and-trainers hillwalking types who might get into a bit of bother? Should they be restrained for the greater good?
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Old 27 May 2015, 13:32   #7
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The crew of that finely crafted and well insulated vessel that you pictured would probably have been OK if they hadn't broken their oars!
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Old 27 May 2015, 13:39   #8
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How do you draw a line? So I buy a 2.3m SIB and shove an old seagul on it. One of the tubes is leaky but its fine for the day just needs topped up overnight.

I decide to take it on a canal, would u have me stopped? An inland reservoir? A large inland loch like ness? A sea loch? To Ireland?

I may argue any of those could be an extreme adventure. Sure I have assessed the risks. But I've not written them down.

There would be days I might make it to Ireland. There would be days I wouldn't make it across Loch Ness...
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Old 27 May 2015, 14:13   #9
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Regulation & compulsory training / licensing isnt going to stop tragedies there simply isn't the resources to police it effectively
The tragedy in Padstow was an example of the fact all the gear & training won't stop the odd tragedy
I enjoy the freedom of boating & hope I do it in the safest fashion I can but I don't want more regulation
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Old 27 May 2015, 14:20   #10
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Does s.94 of the Merchant Shipping Act not already confer this power (in the UK)?
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