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Old 08 January 2003, 15:22   #11
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Tell you what I'm going to do

I'll make a short copy of this laminate it and put it on my RIB as have done for SOS instructions. You never know when you may need it. All this is very good info!!
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Old 08 January 2003, 15:36   #12
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Bloody morbid stuff, but interesting and helpful nonetheless.
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Old 08 January 2003, 15:40   #13
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Hypothermia

Clinical signs of hypothermia.

Very slow pulse, 40 or less, may be imperceptible
Skin icecold to touch
Pale in colour, cyanosis(blueness) of extremities(lips, earlobes, fingertips etc.)
Widely dilated pupils, slow to react to light.
Slow shallow breathing. Blurring of vision
Irrational behaviour or speech
Gradual loss of consciousness.

Management of Hypothermia.

Ensure open airway. Wrap victim to prevent further heat loss. Allow body to recover gradually. Give hot drink only if the victim is conscious and uninjured. Before commencing CPR in a drowning victim, take the greatest care in taking a pulse. If there is a faint heart beat present, chest compressions will initiate a heart rythym called ventricular fibrillation which needs to be corrected by a defibrillator.

Do Not

give alcohol. strip clothing unless wet, make the victim move . apply external heat.

Thats it for now but if anyone has any queries on this, let me know.

David
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Old 08 January 2003, 16:15   #14
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DavidM

I've been reading the stuff. Is very informative. Are you a doctor or what?? LOLOL
Will have you on my boat any time. I will also have Flanker (if he's allowed back) LOLOL - ever??
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Old 08 January 2003, 17:26   #15
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I would say

that in this case lets go for the prevention and not the cure !

I remember when I was in my teens doing the dinghy sailing open meetings year round, (aprox 20 years ago), before the days of dry suits and wetsuits in the dinghy world

I was always concerned when it blew a hooly that I would end up in the brinny one cold day, generally if you capsized you could clamber on the top of the hull and try and right it without getting to wet

well it had to happen, took a dip one cold winters day, the shock is something you cannot control, you just have to rely on your buoyancy aid, it would be impossible to swim as you simply pant and gasp uncontrollably until the initial shock is over, very scary

this is why so many people come a cropper jumping into water even on a hot summers day , because of the shock

wear a dry suit or even better dont fall in !!!
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Old 08 January 2003, 17:59   #16
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Well very morbid but true,I thought dry drowning was after you have been recovered,and with sea water in your lungs it can grow a flem sort of substance that can coat the lungs.?I heard a story about a guy who died of dry drowning 1 wk later when he refused to go to hospital after a submerging and he felt ok although he took in some sea water, a wk later at home with his son he shot a football , he dives for it and the Plazma/Fungi stuff coated his lungs and he suffocated becouse of it.

The other thing I have been told is if you have to go in the brineee and have no choice and are going to jump from a height,then cup your nose between finger and thumb tightley,as you hit the water your body will try and breath in and if you can live for more that 40seconds your chances of survival go up 20 fold.Any preparatory you can do to let your body know it going to be cold like rinsing your head and other areas will help significantly,when you hit the drink.

Great topic.

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Old 08 January 2003, 18:08   #17
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Mattiboy and Crazyhorse

A small story. I was in Plymouth last year BSc degree waiting for the results in the summer (end of June) some 20 years ago.
My wife (girlfriend then) and my self decided to get a small SIB I had and venture it to Whitesand Bay (hope spelling is OK) any way, the day was VERY WARM (it was one of the warmest summers in the UK), the sea was flat as a miror all the way and when we approached the bay it looked like Greece. It looked fantastic!! There were a lot of people jumping in and out of the water and after we anchored offshore our SIB (very proud we were for the little thing) I decided to jump (dive) into the water contrary to what my wife was saying. So, as soon as I heat it I felt like I was fainting, a feeling to breath overcome my will and there I was a few mins (possibly I was anconsious) later lying on the beach with a croud of people on top of me. It sea was FREEZING and the outside temp was about 30 deg C.
What you both say is absolutely spot on. And what David did here is very hellpful.
Have a good night 01:00 am in Greece right now.
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Old 08 January 2003, 18:13   #18
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And you Manos and david and anybody else as crazy as us Goodnight.
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Old 08 January 2003, 19:21   #19
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Very informative david - thanks.

Just to add my 'story' i once jumped into a Tarn (mountain lake) @ 2000 ft in the lake district when camping up there. Seemed like a good way to wake myself up and have a wash - very, very, nearly drowned with the symptoms you describe here - uncontroable panting type breating, muscle spasams, panic etc. etc.

Anyway, i'm still here, amusingly some of this is on video and none of the group realised the problem and thought i was messing about!

Good night all!
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Old 09 January 2003, 01:02   #20
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Anniversary of my Near Drowning Experience

Yup, it's almost a year ago today that I made the most inexscusable cock-up. Escaped by the skin of my teeth with, if it hadn't been so white, a face red with embarrassment.

Please forgive me, this is a long post, but if you read it and after having a good laugh, don't ever do what I did, the tale might have served a useful purpose.

I was working on Magellan Alpha, putting her to bed on her mooring in the Percuil River outside Falmouth. We were off on holiday and I was just making sure all was secure before we went. It was blowing a gale - F8 - in the Carrick Roads and there was nobody out on the water at all.

When I had finished my check list I hopped back into my Avon Redcrest tender and started the little Yamaha Malta outboard and set off back to the shore 200 yards away. I was wearing oilies but not a lifejacket and I had a rucksac on my back. I was also sitting on the leeward side of the SIB as spray was coming like mad over the windward side.

The inevitable happened. The wind got under the boat and over we flipped. The shock of the icy water totally took my breath away but I grabbed onto the upturned SIB and got a grip of my senses quite quickly. I was more concerned that nobody had seen me do such a stupid thing than I was worried about my situation.

I got in position to flip back the SIB and as I did it the wind took it and blew it away. I hadn't tied the painter to my wrist, I couldn't believe it. I quickly pulled off my rucksac, boots and jacket and set off swimming after the tender. I am a strong swimmer but I quickly realised that the cold was overcoming me and I was losing contact with the little craft.

At that point, with the cold fast sapping my energy, I said to myself, "Garside you have finally made the ultimate cock-up. You are going to drown. For a two-time circumnavigator, you are a total waste of rations!"

Luckily I spotted one of the very few mooring buoys still in the river close by and I swam to that and grabbed it. Then I saw a few more and was just working out my route to shore from buoy to buoy when I realised I was losing the plot. I did the only thing left I could think of. I yelled out "HEEEEELLLPPP".

At that moment, incredibly, I saw a guy running down to the water's edge and launching a row boat. He was with me in a few minutes and I shot out of the water and over the stern. I was so full of adrenaline then that I then felt no cold and we even managed to row to the far shore where we recovered the tender and on the way back even found my jacket, boots and rucksac floating together where I had capsized. The tide was ebbing fast but the SW'ly gale had kept them in one place.

I suffered no after effects other than injured pride. But I learned three lessons...

1 Always, however, good a swimmer you are, wear a life jacket. Something in all my years at sea I have never done.
2 Do not sit on the leeward side of a small boat if there is any chance at all it might capsize.
3 Make sure you tie the SIB to yourself if righting it in a gale!

As I said, I am a strong swimmer, but that day I pushed my luck to far. I'm 58 now. In a few more years I may not be quite so lucky; I certainly won't be as resiliant.

And, believe me, drowning is no way to go.
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