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Old 27 September 2012, 04:23   #1
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Pan Pan Medico

Hello

We don't use PAN PAN Medico any more. This is referenced in Tim Bartlett's RYA VHF Handbook.

When I look at references on Ofcom they still say we do but their documentation is around 8 - 12 years old. So I guess out of date?

Can anyone lead me to the official reference or document that covers this protocol. I am presuming that it will be in some ISO/ITU doc?

Thanks

Gary
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Old 27 September 2012, 06:25   #2
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I'm sure if you put out a Pan-pan medico call you're not going to get told off by the CG. IMHO when the brown stuff is hitting the fan , protocol goes out t' window.
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Old 27 September 2012, 09:11   #3
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there are a few words that stop the world and people have your attention
MAYDAY MAYDAY MAYDAY
and PAN PAN PAN
Once spoken you tend to get the full attention of everyone.
not matter what follows :-)
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Old 28 September 2012, 17:54   #4
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You are asking to prove something that no longer exists --> tricky unless ITU specifically say it doesn't exist instead of stop refering to it.

http://www.gmdss.com.au/ITU%20DSC%20op%20spec.pdf doesn't refer to it, so it doesn't exist...?

But as everyone says if its used no-one cares. Even if someone had never heard of it it starts PAN PAN thats enough to say "I might need some help here" and then the content of the message presumably says "I've got a casualty that I want some advice about"

I understood the reason it was dropped was because sometimes people PAN PAN MEDICOd when a MAYDAY was more appropriate. (People resist the M! word at all costs...) i.e. someone having a heart attack the boat asks for advice which then takes time to organise when a a helo could already have been starting its engines...
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Old 01 October 2012, 14:23   #5
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The Coastguard took over many functions of the BT Coast Radio Stations when they closed, including the MF 2182kHz distress watch, the Navtex system, Safety broadcasts and medical link calls.
Previously medical link calls were attended to by the coast stations with their ability to "patch" into the telephone system in order to get direct medical advice over the phone/radio to the vessel. Medico was the keyword for them to take the call and patch if neccesary. When the ability to link to the direct medical advice was transferred to the coastguard all pan pans would go to them, medico or otherwise, and the term became obsolete.
There was a notice that I might have a copy of somewhere when I get ashore.
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Old 01 October 2012, 14:58   #6
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I almost put out a Pan Pan Medico myself the other day when coming back from France on my jet ski. I had the worst stomach pains I've ever experienced; I could barely hold on. Luckily when I had tied up at St. Catherine's things worked their way through and after letting rip a few times I felt a lot better. I'm sure Jersey Coastguard would have been sympathetic to my man-wind issues, however.
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Old 01 October 2012, 17:19   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wavelength View Post
The Coastguard took over many functions of the BT Coast Radio Stations when they closed, including the MF 2182kHz distress watch, the Navtex system, Safety broadcasts and medical link calls.
Previously medical link calls were attended to by the coast stations with their ability to "patch" into the telephone system in order to get direct medical advice over the phone/radio to the vessel. Medico was the keyword for them to take the call and patch if neccesary. When the ability to link to the direct medical advice was transferred to the coastguard all pan pans would go to them, medico or otherwise, and the term became obsolete.
There was a notice that I might have a copy of somewhere when I get ashore.
Thanks. That would be good. The question was an academic one for an exam paper. I know the practical aspects but did not know how the phrase was phased out.

Gary
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Old 31 January 2014, 05:09   #8
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The term PAN PAN Medico is still used and has never stopped being used, all transmissions using the term Pan Pan medico are, in UK Territorial waters, co-ordinated by HM Coastguard. Any vessel or person contacting HM Coastguard with a medical related problem are connect through to the relevant medical authority to speak to the Duty doctor, the Coastguard monitor the transmission between the casualty and the doctor to be fully aware of the decision. If deemed necessary for evacuation the Coastguard will arrange the helicopter or Lifeboat to transfer them shoreside. If medical evacuation is not deemed necessary then medical facilities will be arranged to meet the vessel on its arrival at port.

The two medical authorities until Sept 2012 are one in Plymouth and one in Aberdeen.

I hope this clarifies the situation and that it is still procedure

rgds
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Old 31 January 2014, 05:20   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GJ0KYZ View Post
I almost put out a Pan Pan Medico myself the other day when coming back from France on my jet ski. I had the worst stomach pains I've ever experienced; I could barely hold on. Luckily when I had tied up at St. Catherine's things worked their way through and after letting rip a few times I felt a lot better. I'm sure Jersey Coastguard would have been sympathetic to my man-wind issues, however.
Did you get nappy rash. :whisling:
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Old 31 January 2014, 05:24   #10
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Originally Posted by Scotsnomad View Post
The term PAN PAN Medico is still used and has never stopped being used, all transmissions using the term Pan Pan medico are, in UK Territorial waters, co-ordinated by HM Coastguard. Any vessel or person contacting HM Coastguard with a medical related problem are connect through to the relevant medical authority to speak to the Duty doctor, the Coastguard monitor the transmission between the casualty and the doctor to be fully aware of the decision. If deemed necessary for evacuation the Coastguard will arrange the helicopter or Lifeboat to transfer them shoreside. If medical evacuation is not deemed necessary then medical facilities will be arranged to meet the vessel on its arrival at port.

The two medical authorities until Sept 2012 are one in Plymouth and one in Aberdeen.

I hope this clarifies the situation and that it is still procedure

rgds
Er - wrong actually. Pan pan medico was discontinued with the advent of DSC. In voice terms there are two calls - Mayday x3 or Pan x3. When you give the nature of distress there are the various options to choose which are now highly defined. I am sure if you merely shout help help on 16 someone may respond. If however you are unsure about basic issues of radio protocol you would be advised to visit the nearest RYA training establishment. Basic radio procedure needs training and practise.
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