Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 10 March 2007, 12:59   #11
DJL
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Make: Ribcraft 6.5
Length: 6m +
Engine: Suzuki DF175TG
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 929
http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~insects/aids.htm

http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/resources/qa/qa32.htm
__________________

__________________
DJL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 March 2007, 13:05   #12
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: swansea
Boat name: Too Blue
Make: BLANK
Length: 8m +
Engine: Suzuki DT225
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 12,791
So the official answer is "no" - until you read it in depth and then it becomes "improbable" - a 1 in 10million chance is mentioned. Considering how many people there are in this world it means it HAS to happen - prob about the same odds as winning the lottery - but it DOES happen........
__________________

__________________
codprawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 March 2007, 13:13   #13
DJL
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Make: Ribcraft 6.5
Length: 6m +
Engine: Suzuki DF175TG
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 929
Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
So the official answer is "no" - until you read it in depth and then it becomes "improbable" - a 1 in 10million chance is mentioned. Considering how many people there are in this world it means it HAS to happen - prob about the same odds as winning the lottery - but it DOES happen........
Yes it possibly could happen - it's going to be less likely than 1 in 10mil though - that figure assumes each of the 10mil mosquitoes had previously fed on an HIV carrier.
__________________
DJL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 March 2007, 13:51   #14
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,114
Quote:
I do not know much about Micro Biology
Aidan,

It might surprise you to know that those who do know a lot about it (and those who undestand the detailed virology of HIV, and those who understand the life cycle of the mosquito etc) have given this issue considerable thought, discussion and scientific investigation.

In essence - mosquito bourne diseases such as Malaria are ingested by the mosquito and survive the mosquito's digestion processes - whereas HIV does not. Diseases like malaria can actually multiply inside the mosquito and are found at high levels in mosquito saliva. The mode of infection is through the contaminated saliva - HIV never reaches the saliva, as it is destroyed by the digestive system of the mosquito.

As stated elsewhere mosquitos don't "feed" on blood as such and only (the females) bite to assist with egg development. The life cycle is such that a female only requires one full blood meal every - 3-5 days for each batch of eggs. HIV virus will not survive that long outside a suitable vector (e.g. living person), so the risk of infection between a person bitten in subsequent batches of egg laying is non existent.

As far as the mosquito is concerned the ideal situation is it gets the entire feed from a single host. If the mosquito gets distrurbed it can start its meal on one host and then move to another. This is where the potential risk you describe could arise. The way the probiscus works the only risk is from "residual" virus on the exterior (any material on the inside is being sucked back up to feed on) - so the question then is if there would be sufficient virus present to represent an "infectious dose". The levels of HIV freely circulating in the blood of infected people is usually very low (for this reason tests for HIV typically detect the antibodies the body produces rather than the virus itself). The calculated probability of a single HIV particle being transferred to the second "host" is < 1 in 10,000,000 even if the concentration of HIV particles in the first host's blood is 100x higher than that typically found in HIV carriers. (so if you were bitten 10 million times by a mosquito (or mosquitos) which had very recently (in the last few hours) fed on a person with an exceptionally high level of HIV in their blood you would be likely to get a single HIV virus particle injected into you. This might give rise to an infection. You would probably die from the itching first!



Quote:
Originally Posted by Aidan View Post
Meanwhile, there are tens of Millions dying each year from it.
Its not all from Drug addiction or sex, there has to be more to it.
Why not? The epidemiology fits with the known possible (likely) modes of transmission.

If you were telling me that loads of African nuns were getting HIV and no one could explain how then your suggestion would make sense.

Oh and "tens of millions" is a bit of an exageration the WHO estimate is around 3 million for 2006! Estimates of for the known mosquito bourne disease (malaria, nile fever etc) deaths are larger than this.
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 March 2007, 14:07   #15
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
So the official answer is "no" - until you read it in depth and then it becomes "improbable" - a 1 in 10million chance is mentioned. Considering how many people there are in this world it means it HAS to happen - prob about the same odds as winning the lottery - but it DOES happen........
No cods - thats a 1 in 10 million chance if the initial dose to the mosquito is over 100x higher than would be expected. Its also the probability of getting "dosed" with one particle, not of being infected. And it assumes that you are bitten in the first place by a mosquito which has recently feasted on an infected person.

The number of people in the world is actually pretty irrelevant. The important factors are: the number of people who get bitten by mosquitos and the number of people who could infect that mosquito in the first place.

So e.g. if there was only 1 person with HIV in the whole world then the calculation would still be the same - but the probability of anyone else being infected tiny. IIRC Current estimates are around 50-60 million HIV carriers worldwide. With a worldwide population of 6 billion then that is 1% of the population (although there may be more carriers in high mosquito risk areas so this next bit is probably biased). So our 1 in 10 million chance becomes more like 1 in a billion. If we then factor in the 100x higher than normal dose you are looking at 1 in 100 billion. Factoring in how often the mosquito needs to feed on different people (within the timescales of HIV survival), the fact that you need to be the second recipient not the first, the probability you get bitten at all etc means that the probability truely is tiny...
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 March 2007, 14:24   #16
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
It can survive for 24hrs or more outside a body in reasonable conditions. Remember mozzies only come out in nice warm weather as a rule!!!
HIV does not survive dehydration. It can survive for hours - but only where it remains in a liquid such as blood.
The often quoted 24 hour number relates to: 1 artificially high levels of HIV in the initial sample. The time for >99% of the virus to become non infectious. And assumes that the sample remains moist in a suitable medium for survival (such as blood, semen etc).

In reality the tiny amound of blood being discussed here will dry very quickly and the virus almost immediately become inactive.
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 March 2007, 14:29   #17
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
you CAN get aids from a bog seat - if you happen to have a cut on your leg in the same place as some aids carrier who sat on the seat before you for example.
mmm...
firstly he needs to have cut himself but not healed.
then he needs to leave so little blood that you don't see the blood but still leave enough for an infectious dose to be transferred to you.
secondly you need to have cut yourself but not healed. furthermore your bleeding will "flush" the wound so wash away the virus.

add to this the need for the blood to be fresh (not dried yet) and I would say that it is virtually impossible - even if you tried to set this up I doubt it would result in an HIV infection.
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 March 2007, 17:41   #18
Member
 
Country: Ireland
Town: Galway
Boat name: rockhopper
Make: ballistic
Length: 6m +
Engine: petrol
MMSI: TBC
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 525
Oh, its much clearer now

Bull shit.

Ok so I read all the medical stuff and such. What I have taken from it all is that "it is posible" each one said it cannot happen and then goes on to say that its most unlikely and the odds are against it and such...

Consider this ( I have often woken with several lumps on me from one night..so much for teh one meal every 3 days
I dont care if they are male and female (hard to check if they have balls)
If someone with aids has just being half bitten sucked and the mosie lands on me and I feel it and slap the little f..ker, do you think that as I slap him/her that his /her probiscus gives a shit whether its inward flow or outward flow...
What was the last thing to go through teh mossies head as I slapped him in the middle of biting me...... His/her arse, oh and along with teh contaminated blood.

Now I dont know as much as ye fellers about Mosquito shit, but something is making it happen.
They can happily survive minus 25 Degrees, they can bite through Carabou skin, in fact every year in the Tundra, Carabou are atacked by Sky Black Swarms which deplete some carabou so much, they die from blood loss. They cannot all be female because, there is little else left in the area at that stage of the season...

Cmon guys, I have never accepted such bullshit answers, but it is as I expected, I still have heard nothing that says no it cannot..
Therefore I expect it can. I do love a good argument and I could go through each point raised which is mostly conjecture. By teh way what is the precise enzyme that teh mossie processes the blood with. When is a volume sample so small tht it cannot pass ais, these are all new things tome.

Go on write me off as a crank and say it doesnt matter. Just think about it the next time you are some South African countries,
__________________
Aidan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 March 2007, 18:10   #19
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: swansea
Boat name: Too Blue
Make: BLANK
Length: 8m +
Engine: Suzuki DT225
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 12,791
Quote:
Originally Posted by eupa View Post
Very interesting and I dont know the answer -I have suffered from Malaria on two occassions as my blood is really liked by mosquitos. The mosquito- dont foget it is only the female species that is looking for your blood as she needs it to fertilize her eggs- ( I suppose that must have something to do with it?)

The mosquito homes in your exhaled CO2 and 'tests' your blood to see if its suitable . The question that comes to mind then is if 'a mosquito samples an HIV positive blood- does the mosquito get AIDS??' - or does it have an imune system?? Could the lowly mosquito be telling us something on how to cure HIV infections?

Anyway change of subject for about th 3rd time Codders , how is the tub going??

Jonathan


Talking of Malaria do you still get any return bouts of it cos I seem to now and again!!!
__________________
codprawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11 March 2007, 11:36   #20
Member
 
Country: Belgium
Town: NIVELLES BELGIUM
Boat name: INDEPENDENT
Make: BWM RAPIER
Length: 9m +
Engine: Ob 2*250/2t yams hpd
MMSI: 235030702
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 885
Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
Talking of Malaria do you still get any return bouts of it cos I seem to now and again!!!
Yes but not the same intensity. Just a 24 hr thing when you overheat, and want to kill everybody in sight I have been vaccinated about two months ago. Going to Gabon/Congo June.Let you know.....

But much worse for a 'mature adult' is the West-nile virus. I had that about 4years ago in Florida-there is no cure or vaccine. The bastards just love me.

jonathan
__________________

__________________
eupa is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 21:52.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.