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Old 29 December 2006, 16:09   #11
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Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
The Tsunami was a classic case in point. Many of the news broadcasts showed a simulation of a gigantic wave crashing down on a city with waves at least 100' high - in reality most of the people were killed by a wave on average about 15' high - the sort Britain is lashed by all the time - the difference is we don't live on the beach!!!
Hi Codders, we get freak waves on West coast of Ireland often.
Mostly the waves are the foreboding of a depression offshore (hundred miles etc) and are ahead of it. These are on the back of further Depressions well of shore that may have gone past and north (of jet streams),
Add to this the local Wind conditions and it makes for prety good surfing especially in a West facing bay.
However, on occasion with some Sea floor seismic activity, one gets in a fast moving envelope of water that one does not notice of shore. It comes fast and a volume of water only a few feet or so high.
This is often to blame for washing unwary "non local" fishermen on the flat shelf of rocks into the sea as I believe happened to atleast two Polish men who were fishing in the last three weeks.

And yes, that story you mention was the one I was referring to.

There was a second Tsunami that day two years ago codders, the first one sent the volumes of water of across the Indian Ocean, but a more local "land slip under sea" something he equiv of a Chunk or wedge of Ground either popping up or equally, down under the sea floor. This one was a local result of the first Earthquake, but whilst this was local, it was also a sharp spike of som e33 meters on top of what already happened and thus a wave (3 in total, short succession of up o 120 feet happened in North Banda Ache, as far as I understand.
This does not take from the sensationalism and lack of professionalism that you mention on that day in the paper.
Besides, if it were tohappen as it can including, The Mountain in Tenerief, Cosmic Chunks in Atlantic, or Earthquakes in Atlantic, Poor old Ireland will break your fall.
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Old 29 December 2006, 17:47   #12
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I said on average - there were places where the waves were focused but most of the dead were caused by a much smaller wave - the amount of damage was due to the flatness of the land and the types of construction. You will see many videos shot by people who took refuge in larger concrete hotels who survived whilst everything else was destroyed.

Remember these places never have much in the way of rough seas or huge tides so it is usually safe to live close to the beach.
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Old 29 December 2006, 18:21   #13
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Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
I said on average - there were places where the waves were focused but most of the dead were caused by a much smaller wave - the amount of damage was due to the flatness of the land and the types of construction. You will see many videos shot by people who took refuge in larger concrete hotels who survived whilst everything else was destroyed.

Remember these places never have much in the way of rough seas or huge tides so it is usually safe to live close to the beach.
Of course, it was very local and I only found out about a few months ago.
I also had seen the footage and I could not reconcile some of the footage with what I was hearing. Apparently when they checked some levels of local wash, it was very much higher in some few spots and they went looking for answers. Most interesting, basically they had no chance.

It must have been end of world stuff, it was for a good few.

I have often wondered do people actually have any idea of what the terrain looks like after a Hurricane washes over the entire area such as outer banks east coast USA.

We all know what it is like normally but can you imagine getting out of bed in the middle of the night and coming down stairs out your front door to howling winds, Water everywhere so much so that you do not know which way the ocean is and where land is and it does not matter because the Inter coastel is between you and there anyway. Now add a few kids and not knowing if your house will stand.....
I dont but I can only imagine...

I am sure most of Bangladesh is like this, low lying and when the Typhoon hits thats that. I seem to recall some 30 years ago that 250,000 people died there during one typhoon.

Any takers with that one,, I only remember it borderline
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Old 31 December 2006, 18:51   #14
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We all know what it is like normally but can you imagine getting out of bed in the middle of the night and coming down stairs out your front door to howling winds, Water everywhere so much so that you do not know which way the ocean is and where land is and it does not matter because the Inter coastel is between you and there anyway. Now add a few kids and not knowing if your house will stand.....
I dont but I can only imagine...
Well, my take is that if you ignore all the forecasts and hurricane tracking and advanced warnings to evacuate, well...

Not to make light of the situation in New Orleans, but they've known for nearly a hundred years that a Cat 4 or 5 hurricane would decimate the region. It boggles the mind that people simply presumed it would never happen.

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I am sure most of Bangladesh is like this, low lying and when the Typhoon hits thats that. I seem to recall some 30 years ago that 250,000 people died there during one typhoon.
I don't think *all* of Bangladesh is low-lying, but there is an unbelievable density of residents living in the delta of the Ganges. Last estimates I heard was that if they were hit by a major storm and resulting storm surge, or a fairly direct hit by a large-ish tsunami, body counts may well surpass a million.

The one that scares me is the volcano in the Canary Islands. Recent geologic surveys reveal that the west flank of the island is unstable, and may drop a couple-mile long chunk about a thousand feet down into the Atlantic. Result will be a mega-tsunami aimed at the US eastern seaboard, causing waves that may reach several hundred feet (or more) tall. Estimated affected region is supposed to be several tens of miles inland (doesn't sound like much, but that is probably greater than the diameter of a major city.)


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Old 31 December 2006, 20:10   #15
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Well, my take is that if you ignore all the forecasts and hurricane tracking and advanced warnings to evacuate, well...

Not to make light of the situation in New Orleans, but they've known for nearly a hundred years that a Cat 4 or 5 hurricane would decimate the region. It boggles the mind that people simply presumed it would never happen.



I don't think *all* of Bangladesh is low-lying, but there is an unbelievable density of residents living in the delta of the Ganges. Last estimates I heard was that if they were hit by a major storm and resulting storm surge, or a fairly direct hit by a large-ish tsunami, body counts may well surpass a million.

The one that scares me is the volcano in the Canary Islands. Recent geologic surveys reveal that the west flank of the island is unstable, and may drop a couple-mile long chunk about a thousand feet down into the Atlantic. Result will be a mega-tsunami aimed at the US eastern seaboard, causing waves that may reach several hundred feet (or more) tall. Estimated affected region is supposed to be several tens of miles inland (doesn't sound like much, but that is probably greater than the diameter of a major city.)


jky
Hi Jky, yeah This is the one I was talking about but as usual my specifics were scant. I guess the bofins can work out the displacement and resultant wave. Any takers with specifics on this one.
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Old 31 December 2006, 20:27   #16
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Some pretty big masses fall off glaciers when they calve - doesn't seem to cause much damage - even to ships close by!!!
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