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Old 31 August 2016, 13:49   #1
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advice please

I was out saturday and sunday mornings on my own, still running the outboard in I opened it up and got to 30mph and backed off then something come to mind while I was fishing, What if I went overboard how would I get back to the boat ?? I was wondering if I should be attached to the boat in some way ??
I have my radio on life jacket but not a lot of use not being able to tell someone where I am so should tie something off to the boat and myself if so what and how long.
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Old 31 August 2016, 15:25   #2
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The boat wouldn't travel far when the engine was killed but swimming in normal clothes might be a problem with cold water shock that's why I use a dry suit. As for a tether to the boat I wouldn't if I am out I want to be clear OMO
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Old 31 August 2016, 15:30   #3
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If you're wearing a killcord, then the engine will automatically stop. Don't even think about attaching a line to yourself or the boat. That sort of safety lanyard is pretty much for sailing alone at night while at the helm of a yacht.

If you do end up in the water, then your auto lifejacket (if you have one) will inflate. Make your way to the transom and step on the anti-cavitation plate on the outboard. this is by far the the easiest way to get back on board. A knotted rope is a good alternative if you try to get onboard over the tubes secured on the opposite tube handhold or rope cuff lifeline.

For peace of mind get a PLB.
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Old 31 August 2016, 15:38   #4
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Did I hear of another death today kill cord related
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Old 31 August 2016, 15:43   #5
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That's a good point re getting back in the boat I personnely prefer going over the tube which is easy with a dry suit using the loops down the boat, on the rib I had a fixed ladder.
but it should be practised your preferred way for when the s--t hits the fan.
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Old 01 September 2016, 00:10   #6
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How far would the travel and what if there is a strong breeze would I be able to catch it up
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Old 01 September 2016, 01:28   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slate1234 View Post
I have my radio on life jacket but not a lot of use not being able to tell someone where I am so should tie something off to the boat and myself if so what and how long.
But you will know roughly where you are won't you? You don't need to give a GPS position to be found - "about a mile roughly NW of xxx" will give a starting point to find you. The CG and RNLI can direction find on your signal to narrow it down (you may be asked to count slowly to ten to give them enough to find).

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Originally Posted by jeffstevens763@g View Post
The boat wouldn't travel far when the engine was killed but swimming in normal clothes might be a problem with cold water shock that's why I use a dry suit. As for a tether to the boat I wouldn't if I am out I want to be clear OMO
Cheers
I think it depends if you slip over when fishing, or get chucked clear at speed. Swimming in a LJ is hard. Swimming in wet weather gear or dry suit is hard. I'd say if you are more than 10m from the boat when you compose yourself then if its windy you'll be doing well to catch up with the boat and still have enough energy to haul yourself in.

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Originally Posted by spartacus View Post
If you're wearing a killcord, then the engine will automatically stop. Don't even think about attaching a line to yourself or the boat. That sort of safety lanyard is pretty much for sailing alone at night while at the helm of a yacht.
They are used on yachts in all sorts of conditions, not just singlehanded night sailing. The general conclusion though is that being tethered to a fast boat or an upside down boat would be a bad thing.

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How far would the travel and what if there is a strong breeze would I be able to catch it up
I think you need a plan for both scenarios - and think about how to stay in in the first place.
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Old 01 September 2016, 02:59   #8
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Its not hard getting back into an inflatable.. once you know how .. a simple backflip does the job. I have even tried this way wearing waders and found it easy. Im not a diver so donít know how difficult it would be wearing tanks.



Perhaps its also worth showing how to wear waders safely as I have read some folk saying they are dangerous things on a boat.. they are .. if you donít know how to wear them.. but use a belt as recommended .. and they can assist keep you afloat



You would be lucky to catch an inflatable on a windy day..but again ..its worth trying it to find out for yourself...obviously in a safe area.

Most other small boat users..ie dinghy.. kayak..canoe etc all practice self rescue techniques.. I have too ... it can save your life one day..so worth the effort.
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Old 01 September 2016, 04:50   #9
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its not hard to swim in a dry suit at all lay on you back and do a reverse butterfly stroke keeps your face out of the on coming waves, as for getting in thats an interesting one from gurnard i do it forward hold on the handles bob up and down a few times right down in the water and use your buoyancy to propel you back in the boat never tried with a life-jacket on but i would take that off since i have a dry suit on. poly's right you need to risk assess first what will throw you out of the boat is it worth going out in conditions that would pose that kind of threat. personally i keep low down in the boat at all times even sit on the floor if conditions warrant it keep the speed down and always have one hand on the boat for stability.you have to do something really stupid to get thrown out of a sib but maybe i've been lucky.all about planning really.
also descent wind-age on a sib you will never keep up with it the old air bed scenario.


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Old 01 September 2016, 09:55   #10
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Never tried the Gurnard technique, I have brought "casualties" on board backwards and that certainly works.

Quote:
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never tried with a life-jacket on but i would take that off since i have a dry suit on.
And the maib report reads, "it is not clear why he removed his lifejacket". If it really is a problem better to deflate (which you can top up by mouth) but using the cav plate or rigging a strop as a foothold is a better plan.
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