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Old 19 January 2006, 04:42   #91
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Country: UK - England
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yes as indicated by philip it is one of the items on his thread link, i powered it all up via an mp3 player last night and the sound is not bad. I fitted the console top to the base and started connecting it all up and powering up the fishfinder and gps etc. so is starting to come together

one issue with the amp i have is how resistant it will be to moisture and condensation etc, plus it is hanging upside down and has a metal hood which might collect water!! so is a bit of an experiment at the moment. I wanted to have no moving parts in the stereo is an amp and mp3 player rather than a normal cd head unit, and it has worked out quite cheap as well.

Not keeping up with the jones as indicated as i always have stereo systems on my boats, ie for the last 10 years now..

any other advice and observations are great...
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Old 21 January 2006, 13:20   #92
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Country: UK - England
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engine pipework finished and all connected, tough getting all the cables and pipes down that trunking!!

paddlewheel cable and transducer cables flowcoated in,

console fitted to base and all operational now

engine control cables connected and set

hand grab rail to fit under icom radio

mp3 player to fit somewhere, well chuffed with stereo sound from it

screen to source (template done) and fit then get windscreen rail made and fitted

New member Russell came round today for chat

busy day today
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Old 21 January 2006, 13:33   #93
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looking good hugh - tempted to start a little project myself but have the technical nouse of a 2 year old and would no doubt feck it all up. Just out of interest, without your engineering background, how much of the boat would you have done yourself without too much difficulty?
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Old 21 January 2006, 13:48   #94
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Gosh what a question.......not sure i can answer that one

I tend to turn my hand to everything and anything so not much phases me......except bricklaying and plastering where a fair bit of practice is needed to get the knack and a reasonable speed, i can do bricklaying and plastering but i tend to take too long so is easier to get someone else to do it. I guess you need to know your own limits!!




Quote:
Originally Posted by donutsina911
looking good hugh - tempted to start a little project myself but have the technical nouse of a 2 year old and would no doubt feck it all up. Just out of interest, without your engineering background, how much of the boat would you have done yourself without too much difficulty?
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Old 21 January 2006, 14:05   #95
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Still looking good Chris.. One thing does spring to mind tho, how easy is it going to be to replace either the transducer or the paddlewheel if they don't work??
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Old 21 January 2006, 14:33   #96
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i tested them both, if they dont work in the future or fail will need to cut out the cable with a dentist type drill and fit a new one, wont be too big an issue, i am just flowcoating the cable into the corner for protection and to hide it,

hopefully i wont need to take it out in the near future

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Originally Posted by tcwozere
Still looking good Chris.. One thing does spring to mind tho, how easy is it going to be to replace either the transducer or the paddlewheel if they don't work??
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Old 21 January 2006, 16:02   #97
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Chris - the thing to watch with electrical cables is there will be a massive week point at the point where the cable stops being "glued" in position and starts to be able to flex again.

If there is any movement possible in the cable at the point where it emerges from the flow coat - it wont last long at all as all the stress from any movement will be concentrated at that point.

If possible try to fit a stress relief rubber tube like you get on head phone plugs...
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Old 21 January 2006, 16:33   #98
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cheers Roy

a good point, i have fitted a cable fixing just along from where it comes thru the transom box so that movement is minimal before it goes into the trunking to try to minimise any stress. it is fitted along the floor of the transom box so should be fine.

as it is at the rear of the boat it will get less impacts than if it was at the front.....hopefully!

oops used mrs pc for my reply...haha

Quote:
Originally Posted by roycruse
Chris - the thing to watch with electrical cables is there will be a massive week point at the point where the cable stops being "glued" in position and starts to be able to flex again.

If there is any movement possible in the cable at the point where it emerges from the flow coat - it wont last long at all as all the stress from any movement will be concentrated at that point.

If possible try to fit a stress relief rubber tube like you get on head phone plugs...
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Old 21 January 2006, 17:13   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugh Jardon

one issue with the amp i have is how resistant it will be to moisture and condensation etc, plus it is hanging upside down and has a metal hood which might collect water!! so is a bit of an experiment at the moment. I wanted to have no moving parts in the stereo is an amp and mp3 player rather than a normal cd head unit, and it has worked out quite cheap as well.

any other advice and observations are great...

Don't know if you have already done this but a great way of protecting the circuit boards is to spray them liberally with an insulating varnish or laquer. Holt's Damp Start(stupid name) is great for waterproofing electrical stuff - designed for protecting ignition components.

I have seen quite a lot of so called marine electronics that have nothing much more than this and yet are far more expensive than normal.....
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Old 21 January 2006, 17:35   #100
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what a brilliant idea, i will do that tomorrow. thinking back i have used it before and have a tin in the garage i think....cheers for that

i am also going to drill a couple of drain holes in the metal surrounding to allow water to escape if it condensates in there.

cheers

Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn
Don't know if you have already done this but a great way of protecting the circuit boards is to spray them liberally with an insulating varnish or laquer. Holt's Damp Start(stupid name) is great for waterproofing electrical stuff - designed for protecting ignition components.

I have seen quite a lot of so called marine electronics that have nothing much more than this and yet are far more expensive than normal.....
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